Are there Baby Mice in Your House?

Newborne baby mice

If you’ve heard scratching and squeaking in your walls, found droppings or noticed other signs of mice, chances are there are baby mice in your home too. Mice are prolific breeders capable of producing litters quickly once they’ve found a safe place to nest in your home.

Eliminating mice as soon as you notice them is key to reducing your risk of a full-on mouse problem. Things can go bad quickly. Real bad. Luckily, we’ve been reducing Michigan’s rodent population for 90 years. We can tell you if you have baby mice, how many babies can mice have, what to do if you find baby mice, and more. We’ve helped a lot of people get rid of house mice and we’re ready to help you too.

How Many Babies Do Mice Have?

The short answer is a lot. Mice are a bit of a mathematical wonder when it comes to procreation. But there is a difference between answering how many babies can mice have and how many babies do mice have.

Female mice can have 5 to10 pregnancies a year. Each pregnancy will yield 3 to 14 babies – or pups – with 6 to 8 pups being the average. That means a female mouse might produce somewhere between 30 to 60 babies a year if she stays busy.

A truly remarkable trait of female mice is that they can mate immediately after giving birth. The gestation period for mice is about 21 days. That means adult mice moving into your house could produce multiple litters of baby mice within a month of their arrival.

Now consider that those babies will start to mate in two months when they reach sexual maturity. Once they start producing babies, you’re looking at a whole lot more mice in your house. Mathematically, a single mouse could be responsible for a whopping 5,000 mice over 12 months. Obviously, this scenario is unlikely, however, even in pet stores or domestic situations where breeding conditions are ideal.

Mice live hard lives and wild mice rarely live to see their second birthday. The bottom line for your home is to get them out as quickly as possible and keep them out.

What Do Baby Mice Eat?

Baby mice are born blind, hairless, and earless. They will grow ears in four days, a fur coat by day 10, and their eyes will open after two weeks. Until then, a baby mouse pup depends on its mother for food and protection. Mice nurse for 21 days but mature quickly.

After they ween, the male mice are quicker to leave the nest than the females. Once out in the world and ready for solid foods, new mice will raid your pantry. Mice are herbivores that prefer grains and cereals to eat, but they’re also opportunistic foragers who will take what they can get.

The best way to prevent and deter house mice from getting into your food is to store it safely and maintain a clean home. Some tips on how to do this:

  • Keep food in tightly sealed glass or plastic containers.
  • Cover garbage cans and remove trash often.
  • Don’t leave dirty dishes out.
  • Maintain a clean environment.

If you can eliminate food sources for incoming mice, you can significantly reduce the likelihood that they will stick around and breed more.

What to Do if You Find Baby Mice

As cute and helpless as baby mice may seem, they are a nuisance and better suited to living outdoors. If you can find and remove the nest, do so. This may be tricky if it’s inside a wall.

Poison may seem like a good solution, but it’s not without its consequences. Mice will take poison back to their nest but that means you’re left with mice dying inside your walls. The all too unpleasant smell may linger for a week or more.

Traps are the surest way to eliminate mice, but with babies you’ll have to wait until they’re old enough to leave the nest. Snap traps and sticky traps tend to work best, but mice are quick learners and cautious to a fault. They may not take the bait if they suspect danger.

A Griffin pest solutions specialist can help trap and remove mice from your home and give you peace of mind.

Prevent Baby Mice from Recurring

The best way to prevent your home from becoming a nursery for baby mice is to prevent them from coming in in the first place.

Mouse access point

Audit your home – perhaps with the guidance of a pest control technician – to pinpoint where mice are getting in. Some of the most common portals are:

  • Foundation cracks.
  • Siding gaps.
  • Plumbing and electrical inlets.
  • Torn screens.
  • Uncovered vents.

Seal the tiniest of cracks and close every gap you can. By eliminating all the ways mice might get into your home, you’ll prevent future generations from taking advantage of your hospitality.

Who Do You Call When You Have Baby Mice in Michigan?

Griffin Pest Solutions has diligently removed more house mice than we care to count. We’re proud to be your locally owned pest solutions specialists, trusted in homes across the state. Call or contact us today and we’ll make sure mice of all ages don’t decide to start families under your roof.

How to Get Rid of Mice in the Walls

Mouse peeking through a hole in the wall

How did mice get in your walls? And how do you get them out? By recognizing the signs of mice in your home, implementing a pest control plan and sealing against future infestation, you can keep mice out of your walls – hopefully before they cause damage or die trapped within.

Eliminating a mouse infestation is tricky business. Mice are smart and cautious. Even if you poison them, you may end up with dead mice inside your walls. What happens if mice die in your walls? They stink up the place, cause health hazards… and could attract more mice. We’ll tell you how to tell if mice die in your walls, how to deal with mice in walls , and how to keep these disaster scenarios from happening again. We’re always on call to give you the best mouse extermination advice and service in Michigan.

How Do Mice Get in Walls?

Not only are mice small, but they’re also cunning. They can fit through the narrowest of crawl spaces and can squeeze through small holes the size of a dime or a ¼” crack. They find entry points all around your home and inside your walls via:

  • Utility pipe and wire entries
  • Uncovered vents and air ducts
  • Siding gaps
  • Foundation cracks
  • Chimneys
  • Door and window frames
  • Torn screens

Don’t underestimate a determined mouse. They can jump, climb, and burrow into just about any place they set their mind to, including your walls. Mice are nocturnal and leave their nests to search for food under cover of night. You may not hear them, but you could hear squeaks and scratching within your walls during the day.

How to Tell if Mice Die in Your Walls

dead mouse

Yea, we know this is a morbid thought but unfortunately it’s all too common in our profession. An unmistakable rancid stench is a sure sign you’ve got a dead mouse somewhere. Mice dying in your walls are a serious cause for concern. Not only does a decomposing mouse smell bad for a week or two, but it also invites fleas and bacteria.

Other signs you might have mice, dead or alive, in your home include:

  • Small seed-like mouse droppings
  • Musky odors
  • Urine marks on the floor or carpet
  • Changes in your pet’s activity or attention
  • Footprints
  • Flies or other insects concentrated in a certain area

If you’ve used poison to remedy your mouse problems, it may mean they’re dying in hard-to-reach places where you can’t remove their carcass. Try using snap traps or other types of mouse traps to capture mice for easier disposal.

What Happens if Mice Die in Your Walls?

If you have dead mice in your walls, they typically dry up in 10 days to 2 weeks. At that point, their odor dissipates. Without drilling holes in your walls, it’s difficult to extricate the offending bodies and remove the source of the smell. In the meantime, a room deodorizer can help.

A dead mouse is usually a wake-up call to execute a serious pest control plan. Mice typically nest and breed quickly, so you’ll want to prevent the problem from recurring. Infestations of mice are no fun, especially mice in walls.

How a Pest Control Expert Can Help

Pest control expert repairing a crack in a frame

A certified pest control expert is your best ally when facing a mouse problem. They can assess your home, target where mice are getting in, and figure out where they’re going. Then, they’ll set a plan in motion that includes traps, sealing your home off, and eliminating the food sources that keep mice around.

You can help get rid of mice by maintaining an unwelcoming environment for them:

  • Keep your home clean.
  • Cover and empty trash frequently.
  • Seal food in chew safe containers.
  • Don’t leave dirty dishes out.

Once the mice are out, we can mouse proof your home to prevent them from coming back. This is where our experience benefits you. We’ve studied mouse behavior and we know where they get in. We won’t leave any stone unturned or mouse hole unplugged.

The Griffin Edge Against Michigan Mice

We’ve been Michigan’s go-to pest solutions team since 1929. Since then, we’ve helped a lot of families get a lot of mice out of their walls. We are Green Pro Certified and we want pest control services to be a non-invasive experience for your family. Call or contact us today to make sure your home’s walls don’t become a house mouse haven.

Why Do I Have a Rodent Problem?

Rodents like rats and mice are clever, capable creatures. If there’s a way into your home and they want to come inside for any reason, they’ll find their way in. Most homes deal with a rodent problem at one time or another. There’s only one side to dealing with rodents: it’s a learning experience. 

Once you know why you have a rodent problem, you can figure out how to prevent them in the future. We can help with that. There are several steps to preventing future rodent infestations. First: identify the “what”: your current infestation. When you’ve confirmed you have a rodent problem, figure out the “why”: what made rodents want to get inside? Once you’ve figured out the why, the last step is the “how”: how were rodents able to get inside? After you’ve identified the “why” and “how,” you can make sure the “what” isn’t a problem again. Here’s where to start:

The What: do I have a rodent infestation?

If you already know in no uncertain terms that you have a rodent problem, then you can skip this step. If you suspect but you aren’t sure, however, you’ll have to start looking for the following signs. Rodents are quite sneaky, but even the most clever of rats and mice leave behind telltale signs of their presence. Signs like: 

  • Waste and droppings. If you have a large rodent problem, the rats and mice may leave behind dozens of small, tapered, dark brown pellets around your home or business every night. Look for these droppings where rodents typically live: in your basement, crawl space, or closets.
  • Grease marks. Most rodents have poor eyesight during the day. They move around homes by rubbing against baseboards and walls as guides. As they rub up against these surfaces, they’ll leave behind a grease stain over time. Look for these grease stains along the lower edge of walls in your basement. 
  • The sound of little paws. Rodents don’t sleep all day, every day. If they’re in your home, you’ll be able to hear them at some point. Listen for distinct scratching or scrabbling sound within walls and ceilings. Rodents are generally active at night, so you may hear them with more regularity late. 
  • Chew marks. Does your phone charger look worse for wear? Are there little bites taken out of boxes in the pantry? You might have rodents chewing on your possessions.

The Why: Why did rodents choose my home?

Rodents are attracted to any place that can provide their main needs: food, shelter, and water. Those are the things rodents want no matter the time of year. The most common of these draws are:

  • Accessible warmth. This is an especially huge draw during the fall and winter months. Most rodents are looking for a safe place to nest during the cold months. Keep a close eye on the places they use to get inside this winter. 
  • Food waste. Rodents will eat just about anything, including dairy, meat, vegetables, fruit, grain, fur, and trash. They’re usually drawn in by food debris near garbage cans, baseboards, and other out of the way places.
  • Plumbing leaks. We’ve already mentioned that rodents are drawn in by their three main needs. Food and shelter have been covered, but what about water? The most likely places for rodents to get water access are at plumbing leaks. They’ll drink from leaks in worn down pipes, loose joints, dripping faucets. They’re especially fond of exploiting the kinds of hidden leaks you don’t even realize you have. If you’ve noticed your water bill rising, you may have a hidden leak. Get in touch with plumbers to make sure your pipes aren’t drawing unwanted pests.
  • Clutter and debris. Rodents are shy. They’ll spend their time inside your home sneaking around and hiding. An especially cluttered or dirty house makes this easier for them. Pests can’t spread if they aren’t given the space and privacy to do so. Keep your space clean and organized to take away a rodent’s chance to build a secret nest.

The How: How did rodents get inside my property?

Rats and other rodents are capable of squeezing through holes or cracks that are less than an inch wide in diameter. This means that keeping them out is difficult and requires near-constant vigilance. By protecting their main entry points, you can help prevent infestations. These main entry points include:

  • Cracks in walls. This includes brick, cement, and stone exteriors. Small holes can be filled with caulk. Larger ones can be blocked with sealant.
  • Vents. If a rodent can get into a vent, it can use it to get into your home. You can prevent their entry without interrupting your vents output by covering vents with metal screening.
  • Chimneys. Not only are chimneys dark and out of the way, they’re warm too. Make sure your chimney is regularly cleaned and has a working grate or cap.
  • Window frames. Window frames have caulk and, in some cases, screens. Holes can develop and caulk can crumble, making entrance points.

Bringing it all together: How can I prevent future rodent problems?

Preventing future rodent problems depends on a few things. First, you need to figure out where they’re most likely to sneak in. Try to find these access points mentioned above around door and window frames, baseboard, utility lines, and other cracks and gaps. Seal and block these off wherever you can.

Second, try to make sure rodents couldn’t get the things they want inside your home even if they could get inside. Keep pantry foods in sealable, airtight plastic containers at all times. Keep garbage in sealable plastic bags and take it outside to the dumpster every night. Repair plumbing leaks and clean up spills immediately. Clean up after every meal and keep your kitchen, bathrooms, closets, and basements decluttered and clean. 

The last, best thing you can do to prevent future rodent problems is call Griffin Pest Solutions today. We’ll be able to tell you exactly how your rodents got into your home, remove them, and help make sure they can’t come back again.

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Everything You Should Know About Rodents Near You

Rodent peeking out through damage in a wooden log. Everything you should know about the rodents near you.

October 20 to 26 is the Professional Pest Management Alliance’s sixth annual Rodent Awareness Week. It couldn’t be happening at a more relevant time. According to a recent study, rodents are the greatest pest concern facing American homes today. Rats and mice invade 21 million homes every year, mostly in fall! Despite how common they are, however, rodent behavior isn’t very well understood. For instance, did you know that rodents are found in bathrooms twice as frequently as other rooms? The best way to prevent rodent infestations now and in the future is to understand them better.

We want to help! That’s why, in honor of Rodent Awareness Week, Griffin put together this primer on everything you should know about the rats and mice near you. This is what rodents want, how they get into your home, and how you can keep them out for good:

What do rodents want?

Rodents want shelter, warmth, food, and humidity–usually in that order. They enter homes in late summer and fall in order to escape the freezing temperatures of winter. Once inside, they’ll stick around if they can get their paws on food and water. Rats and mice look for warm, dark, narrow, humid shelters where they can find food and water.

How do rodents find homes to infest?

Rodents are very sensitive to temperature and pressure fluctuations. These sensitivities help rodents understand when the season is changing faster than we possibly could. As soon as they sense outdoor temperature chances, rodents start looking for the warmth and pressure differentials created by drafts. When they find drafts, they’ll follow the warmth inside.

In addition to temperature and pressure sensitivity, rodents also possess a highly-developed sense of smell. This sense of smell allows them to sniff out specific information about food, including the best way to get to it. Rodents literally “follow their noses” all the way inside your home. 

Rodent chewing on sunflower seeds near a home

How do rodents get into homes?

Rodents make their way inside by sneaking through tiny, draft-producing nooks and crannies located all around homes. Mice and rats are notorious for their ability to squeeze through tiny gaps. They tend to typically find these gaps in a few particularly likely places, including:

  • Door and window frames
  • Gaps around utility lines
  • Cracks in baseboarding and foundations
  • Breaches in vents or pipes
  • Damaged or rotting siding or shingles

Wait, why are they in my bathroom?

Rodents love moisture, warmth, and darkness. Bathrooms typically provide plenty of all three, particularly if they’re in your basement. Rats and mice live in bathrooms to soak up humidity and warmth and drink condensation. Occasionally, rodents may even swim up through damaged plumbing pipes to enter your home.

rodent climbing on an electrical wire

Why are they a problem?

Rodents are surprisingly dangerous in homes for several reasons. Here are the main reasons you never want rats or mice to establish themselves in your home:

  • Fire Damage: Did you know that 25% of the house fires attributed to “unknown causes” were probably caused by rodents? Rats and mice chew through electrical wiring, which can generate sparks and start fires.
  • Health Concerns: Rat and mice feces, saliva, blood, and fur transmit several dangerous diseases. Rodents may also carry diseased fleas or other parasites.
  • Food Damage: Rats and mice in your home will make a beeline for any pantry food they can find. The damage they inflict can get surprisingly expensive surprisingly quickly!
  • Wood, Fabric, and Paper Damage: Rodents constantly gnaw on any soft materials they can find, tearing them up in the process. Rodent infestations end up damaging wood, fabric, and paper products in your home.

How can I tell if I have a rodent problem?

Unfortunately, if you happen mice or rat inside your home, chances are they aren’t alone. Even if you don’t see your rodent, however, there are a few ways to figure out if they’re hiding near you. Look for the following signs:

  • ¼ to ½ inch long black droppings that look pellet or spindle-shaped
  • Damaged electrical cables or wiring
  • Gnaw marks on cardboard boxes, drapes, upholstery, wooden furniture, or even carpet
  • Damaged food packaging
  • Collections of dirty, soft material like paper, insulation, cardboard, or plastic
  • Dirty or greasy markings along the lower parts of walls

How can I keep them out of my home?

Start by cutting off their access to your home. Repair weaknesses you find around the usual sites up above using caulk, weatherproofing, spackle, or another sealant. If an opening is big enough to see, it’s probably big enough for rodents to use. Pay particular attention to drafty or humid parts of your home such as basements and bathrooms.

When you’re finished rodent-proofing access points, make the rest of your home as inhospitable to rats and mice. Keep your the floor of your basement, crawl spaces, pantries, and attics as clean and clear as possible. Elevate all storage materials, especially cardboard boxes and linen garment bags. Store your pantry food in airtight hard plastic containers. You should even keep your lawn as clear as possible. The harder it is for rodents to hide near you, the greater the distance they’ll keep.

 

Once rodents have established themselves inside your home, they can be difficult to remove without serious help. Luckily, you have serious help–you have Griffin Pest Solutions. 

Our experts can find rodent infestations, remove them, and make sure they can’t get in again. If you become a little too aware of rodents this Rodent Awareness Week, give us a call anytime. We’ve yet to meet a rodent infestation we couldn’t beat.

What Do Rodents Want This Fall?

Rodent near a pumpkin. What do rodents want this fall?

Autumn is a lovely time of year. The overbearing heat of the Midwest summer leaves us alone as the temperatures start to shift. Leaves change color, pumpkin spice becomes the flavor du jour, and everyone starts wearing socks again. In the middle of these positive changes comes one not-so-positive change, however. Rodents start finding their way inside homes and businesses. 

Just like you pull sweaters out of storage as the temps turn, rodents start looking for similar, reliable warmth. If you’re not careful, they’ll find it in your home. This is what attracts rodents to your home this fall, how they get inside, and how to keep them out.

What attracts rodents in fall?

The simplest answer is food and warmth. Cooling temperatures trigger a response in rodents and mice to seek out warmth and shelter. Rodents are extremely sensitive to temperature and pressure fluctuations, so they may sense the changing season before you do! 

When rodents sense cooling air temperatures, they also start fattening themselves up. They’ll seek out high sugar and fat foods, and in larger quantities than usual. Both rats and mice have an exceptional sense of smell. They can smell all the food they want while its inside your home–often while it’s still in its packaging! If they smell the food they want in your home, they’ll try to get it. Fall is a time of survival for rodents. Any place that provides them the things they need to last the winter is a target.

How do rodents get inside during fall?

Rodents are clever creatures. They’re capable of fitting into breaches as small as a quarter. If rodents get into your home, they found one of these breaches. The pests commonly enter homes via crumbling foundation, broken screens, vents, attic insulation, window and door frames, and pipes. You should see all areas that you need to monitor regularly. 

Monitoring entry points doesn’t take much work. We recommend simply conducting a weekly or bi-weekly inspection of your home. Check for any damage such as torn screens, gaps between utility lines, or torn insulation. By minimizing potential entry points, you’ll significantly you significantly lessen your chance of any infestation, including rodents.

How can I keep them out?

Not letting them in in the first place is the first step. After that, you want to be cognizant of the things that draw pests like rodents. They’re not just looking for shelter, they’re looking for food and water as well. Clean and well-maintained garbage cans are less likely to draw pests than dirty ones filled with food waste. 

Fix dripping or leaking pipes immediately so they don’t have a chance to create pest-adored standing water. Maintain your landscape to avoid giving rodents hiding places they can use to approach your home. If they have cover to hide in close to the perimeter of your home, they’re more likely to take the jump indoors. 

 

If you suspect you have a rat or rodent problem, get in touch with Griffin Pest Solutions immediately. Our integrated approach to pest management will draw unwelcome visitors out and keep them from returning. That way you can get back to enjoying the fall properly: in flannel, pumpkin spice latte in hand.