Holiday Humbugs to Watch Out For This Winter

Holiday Humbugs to Watch Out For

The Holidays are a unique time of year. You travel to places you don’t usually visit, do things you don’t usually do, with people you don’t usually see. All this new activity can feel refreshing and exciting, but it can also come with new concerns and stresses.

Yes, there are the obvious Holiday stressors–family fights, obnoxious in-laws, cramped living quarters–but there are less-obvious concerns to keep in mind, too. Chief among them: pests. Believe it or not, even the most wonderful time of year isn’t safe from everyone’s least favorite (well, almost everyone’s least favorite) house guests. Lots of pests take the hustle and bustle of the Holidays as the perfect opportunity to invite themselves over.

Here’s how they do it, and how to keep them out:

Bed Bugs

Holiday bed bugsBed bugs hide in dark, confined places and remain perfectly still for hours on end. These dark, confined spaces aren’t just beds, either. Bed bugs often hide in suitcase, bags, and other common travel gear. If travelers fail to notice the bed bugs when they pack, then the pest can easily spread to each location visited. Your mom brings her own pillow over because yours are “too hard”, and all of a sudden you have bed bugs in your home for the Holidays. Thanks a lot, Karen.

The best way to prevent bed bugs is to carefully inspect stuff moving into and out of your home. Run clothing, sheets, bags, and other cloth items through the dryer (on the highest heat setting) for about 20 minutes before unpacking them. While you’re away, keep your clothing sealed in plastic travel bags when you’re not wearing it. Keep your travel bags closed tight and elevated anytime you’re not going through them.

Moths

holiday mothsThere are two types of common pest moths: pantry-infesting moths and fabric-infesting moths. Unfortunately, both can be a problem during the holiday season. If fabric moths infest cloth decorations, they might be reproducing year-round. When you take your decorations out of storage for the holidays, you unleash them into your home like a tomb raider uncovering an ancient civilization’s curse. Clean all your decorations before you unpack them to save yourself a major headache.

Pantry-infesting moths are a little easier to figure out. These pests love sugary carbs. Holiday baking leads to big holiday baking messes. Big holiday baking messes lead to spilled flour, misplaced sugar, and excess crumbs. Accessible food… leads to moths all-too happy to eat that food. Clean your kitchen and keep your pantry tidy to ensure that Santa is the only home invader eating the cookies you leave out this Holiday season.

Spiders

holiday spidersRemember when we covered how spiders survive winter last month? Well, it turns out Christmas trees are a great place for spiders to build their aforementioned winter shelters. They make their way through pine branches until they find a sturdy spot. Then, they build a casing of webbing for themselves using the branches as support.

When spiders start to feel warm, they make their way out of their shelters to start eating and mating. Imagine a spider’s surprise when burrow out of their webs, only to find they’ve been transported into a person’s home? Inspect your Christmas tree carefully before you bring it inside. Consider using a handheld shopvac to vacuum up any cobwebs hanging near the tree’s trunk. Spiders can build their webs just about anywhere, so be thorough.

Mice

holiday miceUnfortunately, “not a creature was stirring–not even a mouse” is not always true of the night before Christmas. The Holiday season tends to be prime time for rodential raiders. Mice have an extremely powerful sense of smell. Not only can they sense food through tiny cracks in walls, they can sense specific information about that food. If they “smell” food that’s ripe for stealing, you’ll wind up with more house guests than you can handle!

Mice are attracted to food they can steal, moisture they can access when they need it, and warmth. They sneak through small cracks in the wall in pursue of food smells. There are ways to ward them off, however. First, store all your food in airtight containers when you’re not eating it. Next, check your plumbing for leaks mice could use as tiny water fountains. Finally, update weatherproofing, particularly around doors and windows. Mice are tenacious and stubborn, but they’re not Santa Claus; they can’t magically access your home.

 

Stressful as they can be, the holidays are ultimately supposed to be a joyful, refreshing time of year. Pests are neither joy-inducing nor refreshing, so they’ve got no business bugging you this Holiday season.

If you need some help kick your pests to the curb this winter, give Griffin Pest Solutions a call any time. We may not be Santa, but we can spread a different kind of Holiday cheer. A distinctly more John McClane type of holiday cheer. Now you have no pests. Ho Ho Ho.

How Do Spiders Survive Winter?

How Do Spiders Make It Through Winter?

Spiders are mysterious creatures. How do they know how to build those webs so perfectly? Why do they have so many legs? Most importantly, where are they coming from and how can you get rid of them? This time of year, you may have noticed that your leggy pals don’t seem to be around as much.

First, you probably felt relieved… then, you started to feel suspicious. Where’d they go? What are they planning?! We can’t promise to make you feel better, but we can provide you with an answer. Different spider species cope with winter in all kinds of different ways. If you can’t find your spiders this winter (and you want to, for some reason), here’s where they’ve probably gone.

Nests During the Winter

spider nestsSpider eggs can’t survive freezing temperatures, so spiders that want their eggs to survive winter have to get creative. Many spider species mate and produce their eggs starting in early fall. As temperatures begin to fall, many spider moms begin carefully choosing the places they lay their eggs. Spiders prefer to lay eggs in hidden, dark, and secluded locations like chimneys, downspouts, or burrows. These sheltered areas keep the eggs warm and alive until spring.

In many cases, spiders construct special, nest-like webs where they lay their eggs. Usually, these webs incorporate sheltered surroundings. A spider might create a wall of webbing to cover an exposed corner or fill in a crack. Young spiders inside the nest eat their way out as soon as it’s warm enough to survive exposure. Many of the spiders that build nests for their young die after they finish. Now that’s motherly love!

Insulation from the Cold

spider insulation sacIf it wasn’t obvious already, spiders are quite resourceful! Some spiders survive winter by building themselves a cozy little pod to hunker down in until things warm up. These pods are quite similar to spider egg nests. The spider finds an enclosed, secluded area, and seals themselves within the space by covering openings with their webbing. The webbing blocks cold air, hopefully creating an environment that’s warm enough for the spider to survive in.

Some spiders build their sacs near the ground and let snow build up over them for an added insulating layer. Others build onto the high corners of roofing or siding on buildings. If you look closely, you might see small webbing sacs affixed to the sides of sturdier shelters in winter. On warm days, spiders break through their web sacs in order to hunt for food. When temperatures cool again, they’ll return to their sac and re-seal it.

Spiders Natural Antifreeze

spiders can produce antifreeze inside their bodiesSpider species native to cold climates have been developing adaptations to freezing temperatures for centuries. When these spiders sense dropping temperatures, they begin accumulating glycol compounds in their bloodstream. These compounds function very similarly to the antifreeze commonly used in car engines. They allow the spider’s tissues to “supercool” and remain unfrozen even when exposed to below-freezing temperatures. While this trick keeps the spiders from freezing completely, it won’t save them forever on its own.

After building up glycol compounds, the spider seeks out a shelter where they can hide for the winter. Many antifreeze-producing spiders work their way through the top layer of snow and soil, reaching the “subnivean zone”. The subnivean zone insulates the spider from the worst cold while letting them move around and even hunt prey. Spiders stop producing their biological antifreeze when the air temperature begins rising again in spring.

Spiders in Your Home During the Winter

spiders may infiltrate homes to keep warmWithout the ability to survive freezing temperatures, spiders need shelter to make it through winter. What better shelter could there be than your home? After all, it works for you! Like many pests, some spider aggressively attempt to enter enclosed shelters in fall and winter.

When spiders choose where to overwinter, they’re looking for a warm, humid place where they can build a web in peace. If your home provides them with a place like this, they’ll be all over it. Spiders are excellent climbers, so they often infiltrate homes by climbing through gaps in windows, siding, or roof shingles. Attics, basements, closets, and dark pantries are all favored spider haunts. They also like any place where they can continue catching prey. If you have other pest problems this winter, spiders will come looking to capitalize on them.

As you can see, there’s no need to feel sorry for spiders that get locked out this season. Something tells us they’re going to be just fine. Maybe it’s the fact that they can make antifreeze in their bodies!

If you don’t have to feel sorry for spiders outside, then you really don’t have to worry about kicking spiders out of your home! If you have a couple of problems with eight legs, give Griffin a call anytime. We’ll make sure your spiders use all eight of those legs to step out of your life.

What Are the Scariest Pests in Michigan?

The Scariest Pests in Michigan

Michigan is home to more of the scariest pests around than you might imagine. We play host to venomous spiders, aggressive predators, and something called an ASSASSIN BUG. These pests are different species, live in different environments, and want different things. The only thing they have in common is they all terrify.

These four Michigan-infesting baddies aren’t the most common, destructive, or even dangerous pests we contend with. Not this time. No, these pests are simply the pests we’d least like to find underneath a couch cushion or… in our beds. “We ain’t afraid of no pests,” of course, but even the hardest professional would think twice about approaching these top four scariest pests in Michigan:

Masked Hunter Assassin Bug

First of all: get a load of that name. We told you we weren’t kidding around about true “scariest” contenders here. The Reduvius personatus belongs to the assassin bug family (yeah, there’s a whole family) of insects. Masked hunters are small, glossy dark brown or black insects with wide abdomens, horizontal distinctive “beaks.” Along with their name and fearsome appearance, assassin bugs are scary because of how they feed.

Masked hunters prey on smaller insects like bed bugs. Their “beak” mouthparts are actually hollow and sharp, like a syringe. They stab this mouthpart into their prey, then use it to inject a digestive enzyme into the victim’s body. This enzyme literally liquefies their vicitim’s insides, which the bug then drinks up through its beak–like a straw! That’s… probably the scariest thing we’ve ever heard. Before you pack your bags and move away, you should know that assassin bugs can’t drink your insides. They will bite you if they feel threatened (it’s about as painful as a wasp sting), but that bite isn’t dangerous. That’s gotta be some solace… right?

Woodlouse Spider

This spider has a lot of nicknames: “sowbug killer,” “woodlouse,” “pillbug hunter,” “literally the scariest thing I’ve ever seen.” Females are about ½ to ¾”, while males are generally less than ½” long. Their many names reference the fact that woodlouse spiders are predatory. They hunt at night and primarily feed on sowbugs and pillbugs.

Woodlouse spiders are easy to spot for a couple of reasons. Their coloration is distinctive: adults have a purple-brown body and bright orange legs. These legs are arranged largely in front of the spider’s body, enabling it to run very quickly. They also have large, scary forward-pointing fangs. The spider uses these fangs like a pair of scissors to grab its prey. It’s unpleasant. Luckily, Woodlouse spiders rarely bite humans. Even if one did happen to bite you, the bite wouldn’t be medically significant (read: dangerous). Unfortunately, we can’t say the same for the next spider on our list…

Brown Recluse Spider close-up

Brown Recluse Spider

Yes, unfortunately, the infamous brown recluse spider appears to have taken up residence in Michigan. Brown recluses are also known as “violin” or “fiddleback” spiders because of the dark, violin-shaped mark on their backs. They measure about 1.3 centimeters long (about the size of a quarter), and appear brown, grey-brown, or tan in color. Unlike most spiders, brown recluses only have six eyes.

Unlike the Woodlouse spider, the Brown recluse isn’t just scary. They’re also one of the most dangerous pests in Michigan. Brown recluse spiders may administer a potent hemotoxic venom through their bites. This venom may cause fever, chills, rashes, nausea, vomiting, or even necrosis, or cell death. Fortunately, brown recluse spiders are, well, reclusive. They’re not aggressive and prefer to run or hide from humans. Brown recluse spider bites are very rare, even if the spiders live among people. Brown recluse spiders aren’t the only venomous spider in Michigan, however…

Northern Black Widow

Northern Black Widow Spider

You’re probably already familiar with the Black widow. They’re arguably the most infamously scary spider in the world, much less in the US. And one particular species, the Northern black widow (Latrodectus variolus) lives in Michigan. Northern black widows are about the size of a paper clip. They’re mostly black in color, except for an hourglass-shaped red marking on their abdomens.

Black widows are considered the most venomous spider in North America. The venom they can inject via bites is considered 15 times more potent than a rattlesnake’s. Black widow venom is a “latrotoxin,” which means it attacks the nervous system. Their bites can trigger nausea, vomiting, stomach pain, fevers, and even more severe symptoms. Luckily, black widows bite humans very rarely, and even when they do bite they don’t inject much venom. Black widow bites are rare, but if a black widow bites you, you should take it very seriously.

 

From the scary dangerous to the just plain scary, Michigan has its fair share of monster pests to contend with. Luckily, you’ve also got your own personal monster slaying force: Griffin Pest Control.

If you’re losing sleep about the creepy-crawlies in your basement or attic, give us a call today. We’ll bust those pests before you can say “Happy Halloween!”

Late Summer Pest Infestations

The Pests of Late Summer

When you think about late summer bugs, chances are you picture them outside. When it’s hot and humid out, like it tends to be during Midwest summers, pests like rodents, centipedes, and spiders don’t have much reason to get into your home.

As soon as summer starts to end, however, pests start looking for a place to wait out the winter– a place like your home! Late summer tends to be the worst time of year for pest infestations for that exact reason. Here are a few of the sneaky snowbirds you can expect in the next couple weeks, and what you can do about them.

 

Rodents

rats are active in late summer and early fall

Michigan’s rodents start preparing for winter early. They get aggressive in the pursuit of food, they start stockpiling resources, they dig burrows for themselves, and–of course–they sneak into homes. The earlier a rodent can find a warm, dry, dark place to nest over the winter, the better. As soon as the sun starts setting earlier, expect rodents to be hard at work preparing for cold.

Rodents will infiltrate a home by any means necessary, and they have plenty of means. First, they’ll look for cracks, gaps, and holes like openings in window sills, door frames, floorboards, or utility lines. Next, they’ll try burrowing to get at the foundations or insulation in the basement. More than anything, rodents target places where they can get food. Regular vacuuming and cleaning up after meals becomes even more important in the fall. You don’t want to advertise that your home is open for rodent business!

 

Spiders

the brown recluse spider may be active in late summer and early fall

Spiders begin mating around early September every year, which is one of the few things that will prompt them to leave their webs and get moving. Spiderlings in egg sacs stay warm during the winter. Adult spiders need to survive long enough to lay eggs, which means they need to find shelter. Between the need for shelter, the need to find mates, and the fact that a lot of their prey is fleeing indoors, homes start to look really appealing to spiders this time of year.

Spiders get into homes the same way other pests tend to: by finding their way through the cracks. Spiders are excellent climbers, so don’t think any crack or gap is too high or inaccessible for them. The best way to prevent spiders is to prevent other pest infestations. If spiders can’t hunt prey, they won’t want to hang around. Clearing away clutter will also help keep spiders from taking up residence.

 

Cockroaches

cockroaches tend to be active in the late summer and early fall

Cockroaches don’t hibernate, nor can they survive freezing temperatures for long. Both the common species of cockroach (American and German) highly prefer warm temperatures. American roaches seem to feel that 70 degrees is juuust right. Unfortunately, it gets worse. Like spiders, cockroaches tend to mate while sheltering indoors. They’re even known to settle in with their families after the egg sacs hatch. Any roaches that get into your home in late summer could be the first members of a multi-generational infestation.

Cockroaches want to live in confined, warm, dark, and humid places where they feel comfortable and safe. That means your basement, attic, and crawlspaces are prime real estate–especially if they’re messy or cluttered. It’s a good idea to organize and tidy up your basements and attics every late summer. Clear out anything you don’t need, organize boxes, and repair sources of undue moisture like humidity and plumbing leaks.

 

Stink Bugs

brown marmorated stink bugs tend to be especially active in late summer and early fall

Just because they’re a relatively new nuisance to Michigan doesn’t mean the Brown Marmorated stink bug hasn’t acclimated to their new home just fine. Unlike many pests that inflict themselves on Michigan households during late summer, stink bugs actually hibernate during the winter. They’re not mating and laying eggs in your home; they’re just sleeping. Even hibernating stink bugs can’t survive the cold, however, so before they hibernate they have to seek out shelter. They’ll even let themselves out in the spring!

Stink bugs frequently get into houses by squeezing under worn-out weather stripping, damaged screens, or gaps in window and door frames. Like spiders, stink bugs are very good climbers, so they’ve been known to use chimneys and air vents as access points, as well. Replacing chimney and vent screens will go a long way toward securing your home, especially if you replace worn weather stripping and window frames at the same time.

 

You’ve still got a little warm summer weather left, so now’s the perfect time to get proactive! Some simple preventative maintenance now could save you a big headache come winter.

Want some help making sure you’re totally pest-proofed for fall? Give Griffin a call today! Together, we’ll make sure your home keeps you warm and leaves pests cold.

Pests for Watch Out for While Camping

Don't Let Pests Ruin Your Camping Trip

Camping is the best. You get to be outside, you see beautiful sights, you can hang out with your friends and family, and (best of all) it makes you seem all rugged and self-reliant. Summer days are the perfect time to schedule a camping trip. Find somewhere you’ve never been before, pack your bags, and get out there!

Unfortunately, the wondrous splendor of the natural world has its downsides. Chief among these downsides are, of course, pests. When you think about it, every time you go camping, you’re essentially colonizing the domain of the pests. Here are some pests you should watch out for on your adventure into the untamed wild lands and some camping pest control ideas you can use to protect yourself from them.

 

Woman spraying her legs for bug spray

Mosquitoes

Enemy of the outdoorsman. Scourge of the camper. Rival of the attorney. Mosquitoes are known by many names, most of which aren’t fit for family websites. The bloodsuckers are found virtually everywhere, but you should prepare for them especially on camping trips. Mosquitoes like moist, humid, shaded environments with plenty of natural cover. They also prefer to be near water. Camping sites have all of that, plus their food even comes to them! Unprepared campers are essentially human conveyor-belt sushi to mosquitoes.

Luckily, camping pest control for mosquitoes is pretty easy. First, invest in some heavy-duty bug spray. Apply it every two hours while you’re outside. Wear long, brightly-colored clothing. Wear a hat and bring water to stay cool and minimize sweating. Make sure you wear hiking boots and appropriate, tight-fitting socks. When it starts getting dark out, consider retiring to your campsite. Mosquitoes become much more active starting at dusk. Build a fire if it’s allowed; the smoke will keep all kinds of bugs away. Drape a mosquito net over your tent and/or sleeping bag in the night.

 

tick

Ticks

This infamous hiking menace starts making trouble in the summer, just when you’re gearing up to go out. These bloodsuckers sneak onto campers and clamp down, gorging for days until they’ve gotten their fill. Ticks can even infect us with diseases while they’re stealing our blood. Ticks like campsites because they can use abundant natural flora near the trail during hunts. Ticks climb onto plants and lie in wait. When a victim wanders by, they leap on and bite down.

To practice tick camping pest control, build your camp in a well-maintained clearing. Avoid walking too close to overgrown edges or “off-roading” while you’re hiking. Apply anti-tick spray as frequently as you apply bug spray. Wear appropriate clothing like hiking boots, long socks, pants, and shirts, and a hat. When you get back to your campsite at night, thoroughly inspect your body, clothing, and equipment. Remove ticks you find with a tweezers immediately. If you find a tick on your clothing, re-check your body, remove that clothing, and isolate it from the rest of your stuff.

 

spider

Spiders

Most spiders aren’t actually dangerous. Unlike ticks and mosquitoes, they don’t feed on humans, and they’re less likely to transmit disease. Virtually all spiders can and will bite when threatened, however, and the venom administered by a bite could itch, sting, or even burn. Camp sites attract spiders for two primary reasons: One, there are plenty of places to build webs. Two, they attract other pests. As flying pests flock toward humans and start buzzing around, hungry spiders follow. They build their webs wherever they have the right building conditions. Then, they wait for their prey to spring the trap.

Spider camping pest control is as much about what you don’t do as what you do. Don’t build your campsite under low-hanging foliage and plant life. Leaves and grasses you have to duck under could be the structures holding up spider webs. Avoid touching or resting on too many trees, rocks, or branches. Never stick your hand anywhere out of sight, like in the nook of a tree or under a rock. If you fall, accidentally lean on something, or brush up against a tree or bush, examine your clothing for spiders. Keep your food in sealed plastic containers at least 10 feet away from your tent at night.

 

Wasp

Bees and Wasps

Nothing will ruin your camping trip faster than upsetting a wasp’s nest. Suddenly, your outing is less “leisurely vacation” and more “desperate fight for survival.” Bees and wasps sting to defend their homes or when they feel threatened. Both bees and wasps tend to live around camping sites, albeit for different reasons. Bees seek out the nectar in flowers planted on and around the site. Wasps, like spiders, hunt the other prey attracted to the site.

Long clothing will go a long way toward preventing bee and wasp stings, as well. Avoid building your camp in areas with heavy foliage or vegetation. Watch for hanging hives nearby and avoid them. If you’re allergic to stings, bring along an EpiPen. Seal your food securely until you eat it. This counts double for sweets, because sugar attracts wasps and bees from surprisingly far away. Alcoholic beverages do, too.

 

Don’t let pests ruin your camping trip. Practice simple camping pest control techniques like these and you won’t have to spend time thinking about bugs while you’re out there. And remember: if you have pest questions related to camping, prevention, or anything else, you can always call the experts at Griffin Pest Control. Have a great trip!

Michigan’s Most Pervasive Pest Problems

We’ve been in the Michigan pest control business for a long time, so we’ve seen a lot of pests. Some more than others, unfortunately. Michigan has a handful of pests that show up like bad pennies year after year to plague our homes and businesses. If you’ve been here long, chances are you or someone you know has had a run-in with these pesky creatures at some point.

Fortunately, because we deal with “the usual suspects” every year, we know quite a bit about their home-infesting MO, and even more about how to counter it. Follow these suggestions and you’ll be able to keep your property pest-free*–not just this year, but for all the years that follow too.

Spiders

Spiders have adapted to virtually every environment and can be found all over the world. If it seems like Michigan has a particular problem with the eight-legged arachnids, it’s because despite their adaptations, spiders can’t survive freezing cold. When the temperature begins to drop, spiders migrate out of their typical homes in forests, fields, and gardens in order to find shelter. Consequently, most of the spider infestations we treat originate in the Fall or early Winter.

To keep spiders out, start outside. Circle the perimeter of your home a few times. Clear away anything that’s leaning against the house. If you have a pile of firewood, move it away from your house. Regularly trim your hedges and bushes. Look for avenues of infiltration like gaps in the foundation or near utility lines and seal them. Spiders are attracted to cover near houses, because they’re good spots to build webs. Once they’ve found cover, they’ll start looking ways to get somewhere even better – inside your home. Don’t give them any opportunities.

Bed Bugs

Bed bugs quickly become a problem for areas with a mobile populace and/or old buildings. They love to hitch rides with travellers. They hide in luggage, bedding, clothes, and anything else they can get into. After their inadvertent host brings them home, they make themselves comfortable and often even lay eggs. These eggs hatch, and then another building has a bed bug infestation.

The best way to prevent a bed bug infestation is to take precautions when traveling. Check in and around your hotel room’s bed right away. Studies have shown that most bed bugs are found within 15 feet of the bed. Keep your luggage off the ground and, if possible, sealed in airtight bags. You should also consider running luggage through your dryer right away when you get home. Heat is the most effective means of killing bed bugs. For a lot more info on stopping bed bugs, check out the official Michigan Manual for the Prevention and Control of Bed Bugs.

Termites

Subterranean termites are highly active across Michigan’s lower peninsula, particularly in Grand Rapids, Ann Arbor, and Detroit. The most common, the Eastern Subterranean Termite, is the most destructive wood pest in the state. These termites live in colonies and feed on dead wood. Subterranean termites carve elaborate tunnel systems underground, which they use to access food sources from below. Termites also require moisture and warmth, so they target places where they can get moisture, warmth, and wood all at once.

Make sure they can’t get these. Termites seek out places where wood touches the ground. Limit access to wood like this. Wrap barriers around the bottom of deck posts. Treat wooden flooring to prevent rotting. Make sure wooden siding is off the ground. Remove excess cellulose (wooden) materials like cellulose mulch. The subterranean terrors are looking for moisture, too, so watch for condensation or puddling. Repair leaks immediately. If termite problems persist, give us a call quickly to spare yourself costly property damage.

Cockroaches

Like spiders, cockroaches are adaptive and can be found almost everywhere. Michigan has five varieties of cockroach: the American, German, Oriental, Brown-Banded, and Wood cockroaches. The German roach is the most annoying, because it wants to get indoors. Cockroaches are common in urban areas where they can find easily-accessible food and shelter. Cockroaches will eat just about anything, so they’re attracted to trash.

To prevent cockroaches, organize and clean. Organize your home to prevent clutter. Avoid stacking cardboard boxes, don’t keep anything on the floor, and don’t leave food out overnight. Keep a cleaning schedule. Vacuum once a week, wipe surfaces after meals, and watch for dust and grime accumulation. Cockroaches don’t need much to thrive, so you can’t give them anything. After cleaning, pay attention to moist areas and caulk gaps in your foundation or siding. Cockroaches can climb sheer surfaces, so don’t assume anywhere is out of reach!

Following these tips will go a long way toward preventing pest infestations, but the problem with Michigan’s most pervasive pests is their persistence. If you do end up with an infestation, there’s no need to panic. Just call Griffin pronto! We’ve got plenty of practice putting these pushy punks in their place, and we’d be perfectly pleased to pummel your problem, too. It would be our pleasure!